Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

20

Jul

brainpickings.org

Leonard Cohen on creativity and perseverance.

11

Jun

brainpickings.org

10

Jun

hyperallergic:

allen brewer, “winter night” (2014), acrylic on manipulated surface, 13”x10”.

Congrats Allen!

hyperallergic:

allen brewer, “winter night” (2014), acrylic on manipulated surface, 13”x10”.

Congrats Allen!

06

Jun

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
richarddyorkstudio:





Becoming Being #1 (detail 4)
Acrylic, pushpins and laser print on foam core
9.5 x 5.25 inches
2014 

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:

richarddyorkstudio:

Becoming Being #1 (detail 4)

Acrylic, pushpins and laser print on foam core

9.5 x 5.25 inches

2014 

04

Jun

Everyone is born a genius, but the process of living de-geniuses them.
Buckminster Fuller
You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.
Buckminster Fuller

09

May

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
Adél Koleszár
Mexico City, 2014
adelka.tumlr.com
http://cargocollective.com/koladel

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:

Adél Koleszár

Mexico City, 2014

adelka.tumlr.com

http://cargocollective.com/koladel

justbeingnamaste:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

justbeingnamaste:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Advice from 30 year old me to 20 year old me

Good stuff. Really digging this site.

29

Apr

The Duck with a Human Mind by Eckhart Tolle

image

This story illustrates the uniquely human ability to cling to the past by holding on to our stories.

When two ducks get into a fight, it never lasts long – they soon separate and fly off in opposite directions. Each duck then flap its wings vigorously several times. This releases the surplus energy that built up in him during the fight. After they flap their wings, they fly on peacefully as if nothing had ever happened.

Now, if the duck had a human mind, this scene would go very differently. The duck may fly away peacefully, for a moment, but he would not put the fight behind him. He would keep the fight alive in his mind, by thinking and story-making.

The duck’s story would probably go something like this: “I can’t believe what he just did. He came within five inches of me. He has no consideration for my private space. He thinks he owns this pond. I’ll never trust him again. I know he’s already plotting something else to annoy me with. But I’m not going to stand for it. I’m going to teach him a lesson he will never forget.”

And in this way the duck’s mind spins its tale, still thinking and talking about it, days, months, or even years later. He man never see his adversary again, but that doesn’t matter. The single incident has left its impression and now has a life of its own deep within the duck’s mind.

As far as his body is concerned, the fight is still continuing, and the energy his body generates in response to the imaginary fight is emotion, which in turn generates more thinking. This becomes the emotional thinking of the ego. The emotions feed the story and the story feeds the emotions. Endlessly. Unless the duck chooses to recognize that the fight is over, unless he drops the story, he will suffer from the endless cycle of his mind’s creation.

You can see how painful and troublesome the duck’s life would become if he had a human mind. But this is how most of us live all the time. For the average person, no situation or event is ever really over and done with. The mind and the mind-made story keep it going. Unlike the duck, we are a species that has the power to remember, which is both wonderful and problematic.

Our duck has an important lesson to teach us and his message is this: Flap your wings, which means “let go of the story,” and live your real life – here and now, in the present moment.